Saturday, September 29, 2012

Last of the Pegboard Removed and New Layout Tool Panel Installed


It's been a long time getting here, but the shop is now "pegboard free" - wahoo! I've talked about this before, how I think pegboard has its place, but how I much prefer real wood.

When I was first setting up the shop it looked like this:


As you can see, with the exception of the brace rack, all the tools panels were pegboard.

Well, one panel at a time, I've slowly replaced the pegboard. The first up-grade was to the saw panel, then the drilling/boring panel *. Now it was time to tackle the largest and most random of the panels - the one in the center that was a mishmash of tools - some chisels, files and rasps, punches, mallet, knives, snips, squares etc.

I was just going to pull the pegboard from the frame and replace it with tongue and groove 1x12s. I started that process by slicing open the bottom of the frame with a slitting gauge. Then my apprentice, Teague, helped me slide the pegboard out of the frame.


Then, as frequently happens, I changed plans. I decided that what I really needed to make was three panels: one for layout tools, one for frequently used miscellaneous tools, and one for chisels. Anything from the original panel that didn't fit one of these categories would just have to find another home.

The first of the new panels would be for the layout tools. It was made the same way I've made the other panels, so I won't go into great detail on the process, but here is a brief photo summary.

First, the Stanley #48 was used to create the tongue and groove joints:


The three boards of the panel joined together and with the joint showing the approximate amount of shrinkage I get on my other panels in winter:


There's nothing wrong with just leaving the panel like this, but I prefer to make the gap less noticeable and a little fancier by beading the edge on one of the boards at each joint.

Using a moulding sample to decide which bead size I wanted to use to make the joint look better as it expands and contracts over the course of the seasons:


Beading with the 1/4" side bead plane that matches the sample:


And the final result, again set to the approximate maximum shrinkage and gap:


A close up shot of the same:


And the panel completed, hung on the French cleat system in the shop, and loaded with layout tools:


Again, there was nothing wrong with the pegboard version, but this one makes me happy when I look at it - which is something we seem to be lacking all too often in today's world.

*Okay, I guess I should read my own blog more often - then I would have remembered that I used the wooden T&G planes and that they worked better...sheesh. Oh, and to answer the question I asked at the end of the boring/drilling post - "No. More like soon as in almost two years!"



17 comments:

  1. Great looking, Dan. You give me Panel envy.

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    1. Thanks Steve! I hope teaching is going well.

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  2. You have an amazing eye for organization Dan. Your shop inspires me. With that first picture (B4), and the way it’s lit, I’m expecting a woodworking TV show to start. I’m sure you will, but I’m looking forward to your post of a similar picture of Dan’s shop after all of the new tool panels are installed and set up. Thanks Dan.

    Dean

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    1. Thanks Dean - Hmm, woodworking TV show... funny thing is that when that picture was taken the shop really was like a set - open on the fourth wall - but now it is enclosed which I like much better, but of course now my set is ruined!

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  3. Thanks for gathering the links to the various posts together into one, Dan. This is going to be my next shop project as I am done with a commissioned piece I had looming over my head and the new shop construction phase is done and I can start moving things into the space.

    Unfortunately, it's been a bit like an artist staring at a blank canvas at first. But I think I've found some nice reclaimed pine that I'll put to good use...

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    1. You're welcome Ethan - seems like my old posts indicate I had more time - hmm, must be related to child number two.

      Oh, and I like that blank canvas stage...

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  4. Definitely looks great Dan! I am not a fan of man made materials, but they do have a place in shop, but I prefer something made of solid wood. It looks and feels different. Great post. Look forward to hearing more.

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    1. Thanks - I will post a shot of the wall soon - almost done with the misc. tool board. The chisel rack will be a while though - it's going to have a tambour front to keep little hands safe - they are so darn quick!

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  5. Dan-I hate peg board. Don't know why, I just don't like it.
    But you sir made some great use of it. I love the layout in the 1st photo. very jealous. The new solid wood backing look pretty terrific though!

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    1. I think what I really hate about pegboard are the usual, and extremely annoying metal hooks and such that are used with it. One reason the pegboard lasted so long in my shop was that I avoided the standard accessories like the plague and made my own from real wood. Of course, if I hadn't done that, maybe I would be years ahead of where I am now...

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  6. Wow, you've definitely done an awesome job! Of course, it's always good to use professionals but you dear sir are a pro yourself!

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  7. What is the wooden tool near the center of the new layout panel, just to the right of the compasses? It has a right angle cut out, and then some other angles that I don't understand. Is it some sort of dovetail layout tool or something?

    Thanks, Russ

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    1. Russ - That's an very old (I think) shop made bevel gauge, or miter gauge. I posted about it here: Old Shop Made Bevel Gauge

      In one of those cool internet vortexes, Peter Follansbee posted related information on his blog at almost the same time. You'll find that here: Joiner's Notes
      I hope that helps.

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  8. Dan and Russell,

    thanks for the info on the shop made bevel gauge. I have some scrap oak and walnut laying around that would be good for something like this.

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