Monday, October 8, 2012

Two Down, One to Go


When I removed the last pegboard tool panel in the shop I decided to reorganize things a bit. It was a real mix of tools, and is being replaced by three separate new panels. I completed the layout tool panel first, and now the second panel is finished as well. Yes! More than half-way done!

This one was for the "miscellaneous tools" - tools that are used too frequently to put in a drawer or chest. I wanted these right at hand, but arranged in a way that made more sense than the way they were on the old panel (actually, some of these were never on the old panel, but were "upgraded" to "frequently used" status during the planning and building stages).

Here it is:


You'll probably need to click on the picture to see it closer (well, if you're like me and such a total tool geek that you pore over photos trying to identify each and every tool ).

Now only the chisel panel waits to be finished - but it is going to be much more complicated, with a tambour front. I hope it doesn't take too long - at the speed I've been moving lately I'm already late getting started on Christmas presents.

15 comments:

  1. Looks like an amazing way to keep your tools on show. I'm fairly sure you use them enough to keep the dust off them!

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    1. Kev - Well, most of them anyway - there are a few that made it on the basis of being favorite, but not necessarily frequent, users. Some tools are just special. Thanks for commenting.

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  2. I envy you and all that wall space. :)

    Looks great though!

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    1. Thanks Badger - what really helped with the wall space was building the wall down the middle of the two car garage :)

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  3. Dan, how did you make the receiving French cleat you mounted to the walls? Same method as the French cleat on the back of each hanging board? Or a different method?

    And at what height is the one on the walls set? (I understand the necessary height will vary according to your shop dimensions and your own physical dimensions, but... just for the sake of knowing.)

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    1. Ethan - I make them all the same way (with some slight variation of tools used on occasion – but almost always how it is shown in the saw panel post) - in fact I usually just run off an eight foot section and then cut it up as needed. As for the height, the bottom of the wall cleat is about 6'6" - this makes the top of my panels right at 7', which is as high as I can reach easily.

      It's funny, but that's just one more thing that makes my shop custom built for me. Just the other night I was stepping up on my small anvil (on the floor) to reach something higher on the wall and I looked around while I was up there and thought, "So this is what my shop would look like if I was 8" taller. Huh. Doesn't feel right - I'd have to change everything..."

      Thanks for commenting.

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    2. Thanks for the info.

      Just one more question, then. Where are you getting the wood for this? Box store? (So... 3/4" thick?) Or lumber yard? Or some other source?

      It's all just white sugar pine, yes?

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    3. Ethan - Yep - it's 3/4 from the Borg. And I spend a lot of time digging through the pile for the best boards. There is quite a wide range of quality, and if I take my time, and buy it when it's there instead of when I need it, I can find some very nice stock.

      As far as species, that's a good question. It's usually marked FH (fir hemlock) or SPF (spruce pine fir) but honestly I don't pay much attention. One species we never get up here is southern yellow pine...

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    4. We get lots of SYP here, but it's generally just in 2x dimensions. I have a very nice stack of 2x12s in the garage stickered and as dry as they will ever get. It was originally intended for a workbench (top and legs). I think, though, I'm going to try and secure a couple of 4" thick beams from some salvage company here in St. Louis and do a top with one or two seams instead of 12. Then I'll just use the SYP for legs. And maybe some saw benches.

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    5. Ethan - Sounds great - I've looked at the 4x10s and 4x12s in the local yard and thought hmmm - a couple of those would make a great bench... but it's not SYP - I think it's "green" Doug Fir.

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  4. Thanks again for the prodding to get off the bench and make something. Great looking way to keep tools handy.

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    1. Thanks Steve - And handy is the key word. I really don't like stopping to dig around in a drawer to find the tool I want. With this system, I just turn around and grab it - plus, I love looking at them. To me, old tools are art.

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  5. Dan. i love the panel idea for hanging tools. One question can you tell us or show us a little about your hammer hangers?

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    1. J Contract - I'd be happy to - I'll try to post that in a day or two.

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  6. Dan, can you provide some details about the design for this "miscellaneous tools" board?

    Perhaps if you made a to-scale drawing/sketch to work from, you could snap a pic and post.

    Basically, looking for dimensions and spacing for the various cuts.

    Great job. This is a wonderful project!

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